Completed Research Studies

  • Protection of bone marrow cells against the damaging effects of cytotoxic drugs, using gene therapy. Dr J Rafferty, Paterson Institute.
  • A comparison of the frequency of unusual inherited mutations in the families of children with cancer as compared with their frequency in control families. Dr M Taylor, St Mary’s Hospital.
  • A study of the timing of drug administration, with the aim of preventing damage to normal cells, while still killing cancer cells. Dr H Robson, Christie Hospital.
  • An investigation of whether damage to a particular gene, called MLL, is associated with the occurrence of rare cases of leukaemia caused by the treatment of a previous cancer. Dr A Ng, Christie Hospital.
  • A long term comparison of the possible damaging effects on the density of bone in children, cured of cancer, which has been treated by different methods. Dr B Brennan, Manchester University and Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital.
  • Using data from the Manchester Children’s Tumour Registry to determine the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors in the causation of lymph gland cancer in children. Professor J Birch, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital.
  • An investigation of the mechanism by which the drug asparaginase exerts its effect, with the aim of enabling this important drug to be used more effectively in the treatment of children with cancer. Dr E J Estlin, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital and Salford University.
  • A comparison of the early stages in the development of the blood cells of children with Down’s Syndrome and those of control children, in order to understand why some children with Down’s Syndrome develop leukaemia. Dr R Wynn, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital.
  • Establishment of a research database for kidney cancers in children. Dr R McNally, Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital.
  • A study of multiple gene therapy to protect bone marrow cells from the potential damaging effect on normal cells of cancer treatment that uses more than one drug. Dr L Fairbairn, Paterson Institute.
  • The use of radiation activated gene therapy as a novel method of cancer treatment. Dr B Marples, Paterson Institute Manchester, London, Toronto, USA.